Vocabulary Lesson Plans

Vocabulary lesson plans – research based and relevant to the Common Core standards – The actual sets are here Vocabulary Sets.

Welcome to my latest project for sharing differentiated instruction. These multi-media vocabulary lesson plans are free for you to use. The reference for these sets is Wordstrips 180 Vocabulary Words, by June Barzowsky-Smith.  The lesson plan sets focus on definitions, context, connections, and analogies. They are appropriate for grades 7-12

The same words in the same order are available on Quizlet, -Type ‘tutorclass’ into the search to Add Class, then scroll down for Vocabulary 1 and Vocabulary 2 or, just click on these links. Be sure to “Add Class” to keep it handy.

Quizlet is a free online study tool/app that is popular with my students. They download the flashcards onto their own devices.

 

Now go to Vocabulary Sets to get lessons 1 – 36

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Vocabulary Sets

Click on the photo to go to the vocabulary set. Click on the Quiz link to go to the quiz*.

*Note on Quizzes

– After the first few quizzes, I realized that some students were having trouble, so I created a second version, Quiz Modified, most of those are matching.

-You can edit quizzes in Google Docs by choosing “Make a copy”

-Here is a comprehensive quiz I made to use with Scantron to get baseline data to measure a year’s growth in vocabulary.

 

Vocabulary 1

 

 

 

 

   

   Quiz 1

Vocabulary 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

   Quiz 2

Vocabulary 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   Quiz 3

Vocabulary 4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

Quiz 4

Vocabulary 5

 

 

 

 

 

    

Quiz 5 

Vocabulary 6

 

 

 

 

 

 

     Quiz 6

vocabulary 7
Vocabulary 7

 

 

 

 

 

 

       

 Quiz 7

 

Vocabulary 8

 Quiz 8

Vocabulary 9

Quiz 9

Quiz 9 Modified

Vocabulary 10

 

 

 

 

 

Quiz 10

Quiz 10 Modified

 

Vocabulary 11

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   Quiz 11

Quiz 11 Modified

Vocabulary 12

Quiz 12

Quiz 12 Modified

Vocabulary 13

Quiz 13

Quiz 13 Modified

Vocabulary 14

Quiz 14

Vocabulary 15

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quiz 15

Quiz 15 Modified

Vocabulary 16

Quiz 16

Quiz 16 Modified

Vocabulary 17

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quiz 17

Quiz 17 Modified

Vocabulary 18

Quiz 18

Quiz 18 Modified

 

Vocabulary 19

Quiz 19

Quiz 19 Modified

Vocabulary 20

Quiz 20

 

Vocabulary 21

Quiz 21

Quiz 21 Mod

Vocabulary 22

Quiz 22

Quiz 22 Modified

Vocabulary 23

Quiz 23

Quiz 23 Modified

Vocabulary 24

Quiz 24

Quiz 24 Modified

Vocabulary 25

Quiz 25

Quiz 25 Modified

Vocabulary 26

Quiz 26

Quiz 26 Modified

Vocabulary 27

Quiz 27

Quiz 27 Modified

Vocabulary 28

Quiz 28

Quiz 28 Modified

Vocabulary 29

Quiz 29

Quiz 29 Modified

Vocabulary 30

Quiz 30

 

Vocabulary 31

Quiz 31

Quiz 31 Modified

Vocabulary 32

Quiz 32

Vocabulary 33

Quiz 33

Quiz 33 Modified

 

Quiz 34

Quiz 34 Modified

 

Vocabulary 36

 

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A Snapshot of Differentiated Instruction – Lesson Plans

“Activities for Differentiated Instruction Addressing All Levels of Bloom’s Taxonomy and Eight Multiple Intelligences.” Contortionists at Circus This title, by Audrey C. Rule and Linda Hurley Lord sounds too good to be true. I have found similar articles or web pages in the past. They promise to provide lesson plan ideas to create the differentiation of our dreams, only to disappoint with impossible to do activities or little connection to the instructional standard.

However, the above mentioned document is an 83-page gold mine. In the first eight pages, the introduction reviews the basics of both Bloom’s and Gardner’s work. Then it explains the qualities of differentiated instruction, referring to Tomlinson, as well as making the connections to Bloom and Gardner.

After the extensive references, the remaining pages are differentiated lessons, on various topics, that meet every promise with quality and reproducible suggestions for assignments. To make their intended meaning more clear, the authors organized their work by the category of Gardner’s intelligence, then by Bloom’s levels of taxonomy. Within each category the key words are underlined. For example, List, Explain, Graph, Calculate, Design, Create, Compare and Contrast, and 73 pages more.

Although these lesson plans are designed for specific topics, Solar System, Fractions, Ancient Egypt, etc., the use of key words makes it easy to identify the type of assignment, then rework it to fit any lesson plan. For someone struggling to understand what differentiated instruction means, or what it should look like, this is the ideal place to begin.

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Gardner, Twenty Years Later in the Right Frame of Mind

Howard Gardner jokes that his work in multiple intelligences has brought him his fifteen minutes of fame, but truly, his name has been on the minds of teachers for twenty years. Although Gardner says that he is a psychologist and was not thinking in terms of classroom instruction, many teachers are his greatest fans. When he proposed that humans have an entire set of intellectual strengths and weakness, as opposed to the earlier thinking of intelligence as a singular ability, he opened the door for thinking about different ways of learning. Thank You ClassroomClipart

For educators, Gardner’s work in multiple intelligences seems like a natural step in the direction of differentiated instruction. In fact, it offers a framework for developing lesson plans and activities that will include all types of learners. So, it amazes me that he was amazed that teachers took an interest in his work. His earlier studies of people with brain injuries were certainly useful to the clinicians who help those patients relearn the skills that they once had.
Gardner may not have invented differentiated instruction, but his research gives us insight into the many ways that students can be receptive to learning. The effective teacher plans accordingly when she understands those variations in learning styles. For example, knowing that some of her students have strengths in music and spatial intelligence, she will create a song and dance that includes the learning content. She knows that the student with strong interpersonal skills will enjoy and succeed in group work, while the one with strong intrapersonal skills may need more support in the group. When the MI-intelligent teacher plans a lesson with the intent to vary presentation, product, and assessment according to the individual needs of the students, then she is in the right frame of mind for success.

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